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New project seeks to accelerate pace and scale of change

 

LONDON - The Regeneration Roadmap, a joint initiative from GlobeScan and SustainAbility, launches today with the first of The Ray Anderson Memorial Interviews, a weekly series of videos featuring the most notable sustainable development pioneers from the past few decades. Building on these pioneer insights, the project will assess progress on sustainable development to date and help chart a course to a more sustainable future.

2012 marks the 20th anniversary of the Rio Earth Summit and the 25th anniversary of the Brundtland Report, Our Common Future, which together elevated the concept of sustainable development on the global policy agenda. The Regeneration Roadmap over the course of the year will bring together a wide range of leaders and influencers to determine how best to bring new energy and focus to the agenda.

Made possible by the generous support of presenting sponsor SC Johnson, sponsor DuPont and in partnership with Guardian Sustainable Business, this joint initiative by GlobeScan and SustainAbility – both celebrating their own 25th anniversaries this year – will particularly focus on the role that the private sector can take to fundamentally reshape – and make more sustainable – our society and economy.

“SC Johnson believes that the private sector has an important role to play in making the world a better place,” said Kelly M. Semrau, SC Johnson Chief Sustainability Officer. “The Regeneration Roadmap is an excellent opportunity to bring influencers and business together to create a roadmap for sustainability leadership that is essential to the future.”

Also launched today is the first in a series of The Regeneration Roadmap white papers – Unfinished Business: Perspectives from the Sustainable Development Frontier. Over the course of 2012, we will undertake a series of surveys – of experts, influencers and the general public – and will host a number of live events, to further inform the debate and catalyze new approaches to sustainable business.

“The Regeneration Roadmap is just the type of channel to spur dialogue and collaboration among industry, NGOs, academia, policymakers and other thought leaders to solve some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” said Linda Fisher, DuPont Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer. “DuPont is proud to be part of the conversation to find innovative solutions that can deliver sustainable growth now and in the future.”


To view all of the Ray Anderson Memorial Interviews, please visit www.TheRegenerationRoadmap.com 

In addition to presenting sponsor SC Johnson, sponsor DuPont and media sponsor GSB, The Regeneration Roadmap is delighted to have the support of Globe; the International Council on Mining and Metals; National Geographic; Net Impact; Report Comunicação: Starbucks; Sustain our Africa; Sustainable Life Media; UNEP; the World Bank; and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Published in Global Public Opinion

Multinational Corporations Expected to Play Key Role at June Summit

 

LONDON – According to a major international poll of sustainable development experts, a majority of opinion leaders surveyed (57%) view the Rio+20 United Nations Summit scheduled for June 20-22, 2012 as a critical opportunity to make progress on sustainability leadership, but very few (13%) think it will succeed.

As part of The Regeneration Raodmap, the GlobeScan/SustainAbility Survey polled 642* experts in sustainability from business, NGOs, academia and government in 77 countries. It found that most do not see a clear agenda for the summit (20%), and are not confident that key influencers and decision-makers will attend (35%). Although experts agree that the green economy and the institutional framework for sustainable development are the right themes for the summit, few experts believe that the conference will succeed in making significant progress in the transition to sustainable development.



The 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro was perceived by many stakeholders as a success due to notable achievements, including increased public awareness of the problems facing the global environment, landmark agreements including the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the creation of Agenda 21, and the establishment of international institutions such as the Sustainable Development Commission and the Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Whereas corporate entities were often thought to be at odds with the environmental and development goals of the 1992 Summit, corporate leadership is seen as key to ensuring a successful outcome at Rio+20 in June 2012. Experts say that global businesses need to work together to set priorities within an industry-specific context (70%) and that the private sector should both lobby national politicians on key issues ahead of Rio+20 (62%) and send CEOs to the Summit (61%).



“While the gap between the perceived importance of Rio+20 and experts’ expectations of it is discouraging, we see a strong opportunity for business to apply its ability to get things done,” says Eric Whan, GlobeScan’s Director of Sustainability. “Most companies need clarity to act on the sustainability agenda, and certainty on the future of both global governance and the green economy has been sorely lacking. That’s left only the precious few bold leaders to show the others the way forward.”

SustainAbility Executive Director Mark Lee said, “The global experts’ views captured in this survey make clear the urgency of the sustainability agenda heading into Rio+20. The question is whether leadership will emerge capable of generating any kind of breakthrough on commitments and progress in the near term.”

*A total of 642 experts were surveyed online between December 2 and December 19, 2011.

Published in Global Public Opinion

 

LONDON – A Green Economy would have a more positive impact on major economic, social and environmental problems than today's economy, according to two new global surveys of consumers and thought leaders released today.

The polls, conducted by The Regeneration Roadmap in partnership with UNEP, surveyed 17,000 consumers across 17 countries and 1,600 sustainable development experts from business, civil society, government and academia from 117 countries.

Consumers worldwide say a Green Economy will be more effective than the traditional economy in improving nearly every challenge tested. Ratings are especially high for protecting the environment (70%), creating a better future for our children (68%), improving quality of life (61%) and addressing climate change (61%). 


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By a smaller margin, consumers also believe that a Green Economy will be more effective than today’s economy in creating high paying jobs (32%) and increasing even short-term economic growth (31%). The only area where consumers are more doubtful of the effectiveness of a Green Economy is when it comes to generating low-paying jobs, on which opinions are split.

Strikingly, emerging market consumers are particularly likely to reject the notion that environmental and economic prosperity are mutually exclusive. Consumers in lower GDP per capita countries tend to be more optimistic about the impact of a Green Economy on all areas, especially when it comes to improving quality of life (70%), increasing long-term economic growth (58%), reducing poverty (44%), and creating high-paying jobs (43%).

Reinforcing the resonance of the concept of a Green Economy, when sustainability thought leaders are asked the same survey question as consumers, they are even more likely (by approximately 20 points) than consumers to think that a Green Economy will yield positive outcomes across almost all challenges examined. The sharpest exception relates to fostering short-term economic growth, where experts are less likely than consumers to anticipate immediate results.

The poll results speak directly to the terms of debate leading up to the Rio+20 Summit later this month, as UN Under-Secretary General and UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner comments:  “The Green Economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication is one of the key, top themes for Rio+20. It is not an alternative pathway or a separate universe, but a way of realizing a sustainable century.”

“It is clear that a transformation towards a low carbon, resource efficient, job generating Green Economy is happening in many countries across the globe and this survey underlines public support for its aims and aspirations. The challenge for world leaders, cities, companies and civil society this June is to back the smart policies and creative investment flows that will fast-forward, scale-up and accelerate this positive change,” Steiner added.

Mark Lee, SustainAbility Executive Director, comments: “Sustainable consumption is a necessary element of a future sustainable economy and society. The strong alignment of consumer and expert stakeholder views on the value of a Green Economy provides hope that more consumers may be ready and willing to participate in the necessary transition.”

Chris Coulter, GlobeScan President, comments: “The degree to which people in developing countries believe that a Green Economy will lead to more and better jobs is remarkable. Old concerns about a tradeoff between environment and development do not seem to apply today.”

The findings come on the eve of the UN’s World Environment Day, celebrated annually on 5 June with Brazil acting as the ‘global’ host for 2012 under the theme Green Economy: Does it Include You?

Other survey highlights include:

  • Seventeen percent of consumers across 17 countries say they understand “exactly what the Green Economy means” and a further 53% are “fairly sure” they do, suggesting that the Green Economy appears to be an accessible construct for consumers.
  • Consumers in Brazil, Argentina and Mexico are most optimistic that a Green Economy will improve quality of life. Those in Japan are least likely to think so.
  • Chinese, Hungarian and Mexican consumers would expect to see long-term economic growth as an outcome of a Green Economy more than those in all other countries surveyed. Western Europeans are least likely to agree.
Published in Global Public Opinion

8 in 10 experts fear that governments will not take action short of catastrophe

 

LONDON – As world leaders prepare to gather at the G20 and Rio+20 conferences later this month, two major global surveys released today by GlobeScan and SustainAbility find that expert and public confidence in national governments when it comes to governments’ ability to tackle global economic, environmental and social challenges are at severe lows. The findings suggest national governments will not take action unprompted - and that business has a unique ability to play a greater role in addressing sustainable development. Nearly eight in ten (77%) sustainability experts think a major catastrophe will need to occur for national governments to take action, and 68% identify a lack of political will as the greatest obstacle to making further progress on sustainable development.

The surveys are part of a series of initiatives by The Regeneration Roadmap in the lead up to Rio+20, a cross-sectoral collaboration that aims to accelerate progress in the transition to sustainable development. The findings are derived from an expert survey of 1,603 sustainability experts across corporate, government, NGO, and academic sectors in 117 countries and a public opinion survey of over 24,000 people in 23 countries.

The role of business in spurring government action on sustainability will be crucial. “Working with governments to establish a regulatory environment that supports sustainable development” (33%) is the second most frequent response among experts asked how the private sector can best contribute to sustainable development, after contributing technology and innovation (41%). Government experts are even more likely to highlight the need for business to collaborate with government (42%).

“The surveys make it clear that society has greater expectations for business than it did [at Rio] in 1992,” said Dr. Rainer Feurer, Senior Vice President Corporate Strategy, Planning and Environment at BMW Group, a presenting sponsor of The Regeneration Project. “We think that those who see this as an opportunity rather than as a challenge will prevail in the long run. This is why the BMW Group strategically focuses on sustainable mobility solutions.”

“Based on The Regeneration Roadmap’s recent poll data, it’s clear that there is much to do as we look ahead in terms of sustainability leadership,” said Kelly M. Semrau, Chief Sustainability Officer at SC Johnson, also a presenting sponsor of The Regeneration Project. “SC Johnson believes that we all have a role to play, from public and private sector, and we’re going to need to work together to set clear goals, priorities and action plans.”

“We find ourselves in a very challenging dynamic,” said Chris Coulter, President of GlobeScan. “Both the global public and experts have low expectations for governments to provide the necessary leadership to move us toward a sustainable footing, yet we need governments engaged to make progress quickly. It likely falls on business to not only continue to transform the economy but also cajole governments into action.”

Mark Lee, Executive Director of SustainAbility, comments: “Our polls underscore the gravity of the sustainable development challenge and make it clear that business can contribute by supporting policy that accelerates sustainability progress, sharing technology and improving its own performance – actions which will close the trust gap faced by business regarding its own performance record.”


Additional findings from the surveys

A sense of system breakdown: Nearly eight in ten (78%) sustainability experts believe the current economic system must be substantially overhauled and a similar percentage (77%) say that major catastrophes will need to occur before governments will act on sustainability.

New and collaborative models of leadership are key, including social movements and cross-sector partnerships - but government must be involved: Asked to rate the contribution of major societal actors on sustainability since the 1992 Earth Summit, 33% of experts rated the contribution of multi-sector partnerships to sustainable development since the 1992 Earth Summit as “good” or “excellent” - far higher than either government or business alone.

Failing grades on society’s progress since the first Rio Earth Summit in 1992: A matter of weeks before the Rio+20 Earth Summit, fewer than half of the 24,000 citizens surveyed believe that society has become better at protecting the environment, improving economic wellbeing, and creating healthier and more equitable societies. Experts share this view for the most part, but were even more negative on health and equity.


Methodology

About the Global Public Opinion Survey

Representative samples of approximately 1,000 adults per country in 23 countries (n=24,441) were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 2011 and February 2012. Questions were rated by half samples in all countries. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.9 to 4.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

About the Survey of Sustainability Experts

The findings are drawn from a GlobeScan / SustainAbility survey of sustainability experts across corporate, government, NGO, academic, research, and service / media organizations in 117 countries. From mid-April to mid-May 2012, a total of 1,603 experts were surveyed online by GlobeScan, SustainAbility and The Regeneration Roadmap partners—ICMM, UNEP, Civicus, WBCSD, World Bank, CBSR, and GLOBE. Participants comprise a highly-experienced respondent pool: 58 percent have more than ten years of experience working on sustainability issues; 31 percent have five to ten years of experience; 12 percent have three to four years of experience.


Sustainability Expert Findings

 

Fundamental system rethink is required, according to experts

 

QUESTION WORDING: Below are pairs of statements that capture some current sustainable development debates. For each pair, please select the statement that is closer to your opinion. 



Experts are pessimistic on government’s ability to be proactive

 

QUESTION WORDING: Below are pairs of statements that capture some current sustainable development debates. For each pair, please select the statement that is closer to your opinion.



National governments receive the worst performance ratings from experts when it comes to contributing to SD

 

QUESTION WORDING: How would you rate the performance of each of the following types of organizations in terms of its contribution to progress on sustainable development since the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio?



Sustainability experts identify lack of political will as the most significant barrier to progress

 

QUESTION WORDING: The Rio Earth Summit in 1992, and specifically its Agenda 21 document, provided an agenda for action toward sustainability. Please indicate which three of the following you think are the most significant barriers to progress on Agenda 21.


While we have made progress economically and environmentally in the past 20 years, experts believe we have lost ground socially

 

QUESTION WORDING: How would you rate society’s progress globally in the past twenty years on the following challenges?


 

Global Public Opinion Survey Findings

 

The global public rates scientists and NGOs as making most progress on SD; governments viewed most negatively

 

QUESTION WORDING: How well would you say each of the following institutions are doing in helping make progress on these economic, social and environmental challenges? How about [ ], is it doing a very good job, a good job, a poor job or a very poor job?



Globally, people believe only moderate progress has been made since the first Earth Summit...

 

QUESTION WORDING: For each of the following challenges, please tell me whether you think it has got better, got worse, or stayed about the same over the last twenty years. Is that a lot or somewhat better/worse?



…but a large degree of optimism among the global public that further progress will be made in the next 20 years

 

QUESTION WORDING: And how optimistic or pessimistic are you that leaders will make progress in addressing each of these challenges over the next twenty years? How about…?

Published in Global Public Opinion

Only 1 in 20 say their country should not commit to any international agreements

 

LONDON – As the Rio+20 Earth Summit kicks off in Brazil this week, a new poll of 17,000 consumers across 17 countries finds that 55% of people worldwide want their government to “play a leadership role in making ambitious international commitments to reduce global poverty in ways that improve the environment.” A further 40% want their government to support moderate international commitments to the same end. The findings put pressure on summit negotiators to deliver an outcome that will satisfy constituents at home.

The survey, conducted in collaboration with National Geographic, is part of a series of initiatives by The Regeneration Roadmap in the lead up to Rio+20, a cross-sectoral collaboration that aims to accelerate progress in the transition to sustainable development.

Consumers in Latin America are particularly demanding of their governments at the conference, with strong majorities in Mexico (80%), Brazil (74%)—the summit’s host—and Argentina (67%) calling for ambitious leadership positions at the conference. Indians (63%) are the next most likely to want their delegates to take ambitious action at the Rio+20 Summit followed by Canadians (58%).  Half of American and Chinese consumers (51% each) call for their governments to provide ambitious leadership at the conference. Germans are the least likely of those in the 17 countries surveyed to support a leadership position by their government at the conference (43%).



Perhaps the most compelling finding of the survey is that so few people—only 5 percent globally--want their countries to avoid committing to any international agreements at the summit. Americans are the most inclined to prefer that their government makes no international commitment, at 11%.

The poll is a strong endorsement of the view that international agreements are needed to resolve international sustainable development challenges.

Terry Garcia, Executive Vice President for Mission Programs at National Geographic, commented, “Everyone heading to Rio should be heartened to hear that there is broad public support for leaders to take meaningful action on issues related to climate change. Surveys like this suggest there is real opportunity here.”

Eric Whan, Sustainability Director at GlobeScan said: “The poll makes it clear that people want their governments to push for an ambitious global agreement at Rio, even if that is not a goal of the summit. Like we have seen in other research with National Geographic, people are craving visionary leadership so that they can follow suit in their own behavior as consumers.”

Lindsay Clinton, Senior Manager at SustainAbility commented: “While international treaties are not an expected outcome from Rio+20, the evidence that consumers want national governments to lead is a call to arms. If governments fail to act, we hope that the private sector will heed the call from consumers and exhibit leadership through their own sustainability commitments at the Summit.” 


METHODOLOGY

About the Global Public Opinion Survey

Representative samples of approximately 1,000 adult consumers per country in 17 countries (n=17,159) were surveyed online between March 2012 and May 2012. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and SustainAbility in collaboration with National Geographic. The question wording is:

Q.  2012 marks the 20th anniversary of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit where national governments made plans together to improve the environment and society. Another major international Earth Summit will occur this June, where countries will try to agree on commitments to reduce global poverty in ways that improve the environment. Which of the following do you think should be [COUNTRY’s] strategy at this meeting?

  1. [COUNTRY] should play a leadership role in making ambitious international commitments to reduce global poverty in ways that improve the environment
  2. [COUNTRY] should support only moderate international commitments to reduce global poverty in ways that improve the environment
  3. [COUNTRY] should not agree to any international commitments to reduce global poverty in ways that improve the environment
Published in Global Public Opinion

 

LONDON - On the eve of the holiday shopping season, a new study by The Regeneration Roadmap - a joint project by the GlobeScan Foundation, SustainAbility, and BBMG - finds that consumers are rethinking consumption with sustainability in mind. According to The Regeneration Consumer Study, two-thirds of consumers in six countries say that “as a society, we need to consume a lot less to improve the environment for future generations” (66%), and that they feel “a sense of responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society” (65%). The findings are based on an online survey of 6,224 consumers across Brazil, China, India, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States conducted in September and October 2012.

Rethinking Consumption Consumers and the Future of Sustainability The Regeneration Roadmap-Click-to-Read

The affinity toward sustainable consumption is being led by consumers in developing markets (Brazil, China, India), who are more than twice as likely as their counterparts in developed markets (Germany, UK, US) to report purchasing products because of environmental and social benefits (51% to 22%, respectively), being willing to pay more for sustainable products(60% to 26%) and encouraging others to buy from companies that are socially and environmentally responsible (70% to 34%).

However, significant barriers to sustainable purchasing remain for consumers across all markets, including perceptions of product performance, high prices, skepticism about product claims and a lack of knowledge about what makes a product socially or environmentally responsible.

"Consumers are seeking brands that can improve their own lives while creating a more sustainable economy that can benefit all," said Raphael Bemporad, Co-Founder of brand innovation consultancy BBMG. "While there is strong interest in purchasing more sustainable products, perceptions around price, performance and skepticism about product claims remain top barriers to action."

“The Regeneration Consumer Study shows sustainability is fast becoming a key factor when it comes to consumers’ purchasing decisions, yet there are still barriers that need to be addressed,” said Kelly M. Semrau, Chief Sustainability Officer, at SC Johnson. “At SC Johnson, we are committed to learning more, so that we can create better products for consumers around the globe.”

"We believe understanding people's aspirations around consumerism and sustainability is an important area of inquiry,” said Ursula Mathar, Head of Sustainability and Environmental Protection, at BMW Group. “This topic requires a great deal more understanding in order to increase sustainable consumption, which is why BMW Group supports The Regeneration Consumer Study."

Key Findings from the Regeneration Consumer Study

  • Consuming Less, Consuming Better: While 66% of consumers across the six countries surveyed believe in consuming less, the pattern varies across markets, with 76% of consumers in developing markets and 57% in developed markets being inclined to believe that “as a society, we need to consume a lot less to improve the environment for future generations.” Similarly, consumers in emerging markets are much more likely than consumers in developed markets to “feel a sense of responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society” (82% to 49%, respectively).
  • Shifting Perceptions: Views on Price, Performance and Credibility Most Frequently Undermine Sustainable Purchasing: A majority of consumers globally agree or strongly agree that they would “purchase more products that are environmentally and socially responsible” if they “performed as well as, or better than, products they usually buy” (75%), “it didn’t cost more” (70%), “companies’ health and environmental claims were more believable” (64%), they “had a better understanding of what makes products environmentally or socially responsible” (63%), or they “could see environmental or social benefits of the products right away” (63%). Price is the top barrier to green purchasing in developed markets (78%) while product performance (74%) is the top barrier in developing markets along with needing “a better understanding of what makes products socially and environmentally responsible” (72%).
  • Collaboration and Participation – Being Part of the Solution: Two-thirds of consumers globally (67%) are “interested in sharing their ideas, opinions and experiences with companies to help them develop better products or create new solutions,” while seven in ten consumers (72%) globally “believe in voting and advocating for issues important to me.”

"With the Regeneration Consumer Study, our goal is to bring the consumer voice into the sustainability conversation and help articulate specific decisions and actions that companies can take to accelerate and grow a more sustainable economy," said Eric Whan, GlobeScan’s Director of Sustainability. “With data-driven ideas, we want to help companies make the business case for sustainable development and advance the creation and deployment of more sustainable products, policies and practices."

"Our economy and natural environment are facing unprecedented stresses as scarce resources are stretched to meet growing needs,” said Mark Lee, Executive Director at SustainAbility. “Through the Regeneration Consumer Study, we are revealing how consumer attitudes, behaviors and collaboration can help enterprising brands as they work to innovate smarter, safer, cleaner and greener solutions."

Background and Methodology

Developed by BBMG, GlobeScan and SustainAbility, The Regeneration Consumer Study is an in-depth online survey of consumer attitudes, motivations and behaviors relating to sustainable consumption among 6,224 respondents across six major international markets (Brazil, China, Germany, India, the United Kingdom and the United States) conducted in September and October 2012. Drawn from consumer research panels, global data are comparable to having a margin of error of +/- 1.3 percent. Analysis of country-level data reflects a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

The study is part of the The Regeneration Roadmap, a collaborative and multi-faceted thought leadership initiative designed to engage the private sector in advancing sustainable development by improving sustainability strategy, increasing credibility and delivering results at greater speed and scale.

Presenting Sponsors of The Regeneration Roadmap are BMW Group and SC Johnson. Sponsors include Cisco, DuPont, Interface and Pfizer. The Regeneration Consumer Study is sponsored by Campbell Soup Company, Itau, L’Oréal, Shell and Starbucks.

Published in Global Public Opinion

 

NEW YORK CITY - Trust is no longer in your hands. According to a study by the GlobeScan Foundation, SustainAbility, and BBMG, social sources of trust like consumer reviews, blogs and message boards (28%) as well as friends, family and co-workers (27%) now rival traditional sources like certifications (40%) and media reports (31%) as consumers’ most trusted sources for determining whether a product is socially and environmentally responsible. Barely one in ten consumers relies on company advertisements or website content for information, showing that the most trusted sources are often beyond a company’s control.

According to the study — Re:Thinking Consumption: Consumers and the Future of Sustainability — consumers in emerging markets (Brazil, China and India) are more than four times as likely as those in developed markets (UK, USA, Germany) to turn to social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn as a trusted source of information (22% to 5% respectively).

“Our findings reflect the new context for corporate reputation and trust, as peer-to-peer communication and social platforms rival certifications and media reports as the most reliable sources of information on sustainable product claims for consumers,” says Eric Whan, Sustainability Director at GlobeScan. “Forward-thinking brands will increasingly tap peer networks and social media channels to try to drive trust. Authenticity will determine their success.”

Rethinking Consumption Consumers and the Future of Sustainability The Regeneration Roadmap-Click-to-Read“Simply put, companies no longer own their brands. They are co-owned and co-created by consumers whose experiences, ideas and opinions are now shaping brand perceptions and trust,” says Raphael Bemporad, co-founder of brand innovation consultancy BBMG. “Companies that cultivate honest and collaborative relationships with consumers will be best positioned to win their trust, loyalty and participation.”

 

Re:Thinking Consumption Report – Key Findings:

Most Trusted Sources:

  • Consumers’ most trusted sources “to inform you about whether a product is environmentally and socially responsible” include certification seals or labels on product packaging (40%), media reports (31%), consumer reviews, ratings, blogs or message boards (28%), friends, family or co-workers (27%) and government information or reports (25%).

Least Trusted Sources:

  • Consumers’ least trusted sources include company advertisements (11%), films or documentaries (11%), company website or a company’s Facebook page (7%) and church, temple or other spiritual communities (3%). Five percent of consumers say they have “no way of knowing who to trust for this information.”

Market Differences:

  • Twenty-two percent of consumers in emerging markets identify “social media like Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn” as one of their most trusted sources of information, while only 5% of consumers in developed markets choose the same.
  • Twenty percent of consumers in emerging markets identify “corporate social responsibility or sustainability reports” as one of their most trusted sources of information, while only 9% of consumers in developed markets choose the same.
  • Fifteen percent of consumers in emerging markets identify “endorsements by organizations you trust” as one of their most trusted sources of, while 29% of consumers in developed markets choose the same.

Background and Methodology:

Developed by BBMG, GlobeScan and SustainAbility, Re:Thinking Consumption is an in-depth online survey of consumer attitudes, motivations and behaviors relating to sustainable consumption among 6,224 respondents across six major international markets (Brazil, China, Germany, India, the United Kingdom and the United States) conducted in September and October 2012. Drawn from consumer research panels, global data are comparable to having a margin of error of +/- 1.3 percent. Analysis of country-level data reflects a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

The study is part of the The Regeneration Roadmap, a collaborative and multi-faceted thought leadership initiative designed to engage the private sector in advancing sustainable development by improving sustainability strategy, increasing credibility and delivering results at greater speed and scale.

Presenting Sponsors of The Regeneration Roadmap are BMW Group and SC Johnson. Sponsors include Cisco, DuPont, Interface and Pfizer. The Regeneration Consumer Study is sponsored by Campbell Soup Company, Itau, L’Oréal, Shell and Starbucks.

Published in Global Public Opinion

Consumers are buying less, but buying better according to a new survey by the GlobeScan Foundation, SustainAbility, and BBMG. The Regeneration Consumer Study is an in-depth online survey of consumer attitudes, motivations and behaviors relating to sustainable consumption among 6,224 respondents across six major international markets conducted in September and October 2012. Presenting sponsors of The Regeneration Roadmap are BMW Group and SC Johnson. Sponsors include Cisco, DuPont, Interface and Pfizer. The Regeneration Consumer Study is sponsored by Campbell Soup Company, Itau, L’Oréal, Shell and Starbucks.

Published in Global Public Opinion

Study finds large majority of consumers say “ingredient transparency” among top purchase drivers for food, beauty and household products, yet only 57% regularly check the list of ingredients before purchasing


NEW YORK CITY - A study by The Regeneration Roadmap - a joint project by the GlobeScan Foundation, SustainAbility, and BBMG - finds that nearly 9 in 10 consumers globally (86%) say "ingredient transparency is extremely important or very important” for companies to address as part of their products, services, or operations, including 88% of consumers in emerging markets and 84% of consumers in developed markets. However, only 57% regularly “check the list of ingredients before purchasing” products, highlighting the gap between interest and action in sustainable consumption.

According to the report – Re:Thinking Consumption: Consumers and the Future of Sustainability – ingredient transparency is also a “very important” or “important” factor in purchase decisions across key categories, such as food and beverage (82%), beauty and personal care (82%), and household products (82%). The study draws from an online survey of 6,224 consumers across Brazil, China, India, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States.

“Many consumers globally believe they have the right to know what products are made of and they want companies to ensure their products are safe and effective,” said Eric Whan, Sustainability Director at GlobeScan. “However, there’s a gap between interest and action when it comes to actually reading the list of ingredients on product packaging.”

Rethinking Consumption Consumers and the Future of Sustainability The Regeneration Roadmap-Click-to-Read"The overwhelming majority of consumers identifies ingredient transparency as an important consideration in making purchase decisions for food, beauty and household products,” said Raphael Bemporad, co-founder of brand innovation consultancy BBMG. “Across multiple markets and product categories, consumers are expressing interest in what goes in, on and around their bodies.”

 

Re:Thinking Consumption Report – Key Findings:

Food and Beverage:

  • Ingredient Transparency: More than 8 in 10 consumers globally say that “ingredient transparency is a very important or important factor” (82%) when shopping for food and beverage products, including 86% of consumers in emerging markets and 78% in developed markets.
  • Non-GMOs: Additionally, nearly two-thirds of consumers seek food and beverage products “made with no genetically modified organisms” (64%) while making purchase decisions, including 78% in emerging markets and 52% in developed markets.
  • Natural Ingredients: Eighty percent of consumers polled from six different countries consider it "very important or important" that their food and beverage purchases are "made with natural ingredients," including 88% of consumers in emerging markets and 72% in developed markets.

Beauty and Personal Care:

  • Ingredient Transparency: More than 8 in 10 consumers globally (82%) say that ingredient transparency is a “very important or important” factor when shopping for beauty and personal care products, including 88% in emerging markets and 76% in developed markets.
  • No Harsh Chemicals or Toxins: Additionally, 87% of consumers say “uses no harsh chemicals or toxins” drives their product purchases in the beauty and personal care category, including 91% in emerging markets and 82% in developed markets.

Household Products:

  • Ingredient Transparency: A total of 82% of consumers seek “ingredient transparency” when purchasing household goods, including 87% in emerging markets and 77% in developed markets.
  • No Harsh Chemicals or Toxins: The majority (85%) of consumers globally consider “made with no harsh chemicals or toxins” to be a very important or important qualification when purchasing household care products, including 89% in emerging markets and 81% in developed markets. 

Box Turners:

  • Checking the List of Ingredients: Nearly 6 in 10 consumers (57%) say they “checked the list of ingredients before purchasing” products either all of the time or most of the time during the last year, including 65% in emerging markets and 49% in developed markets.

Background and Methodology:

Developed by BBMG, GlobeScan and SustainAbility, The Regeneration Consumer Study is an in-depth online survey of consumer attitudes, motivations and behaviors relating to sustainable consumption among 6,224 respondents across six major international markets (Brazil, China, Germany, India, the United Kingdom and the United States) conducted in September and October 2012. Drawn from consumer research panels, global data are comparable to having a margin of error of +/- 1.3 percent. Analysis of country-level data reflects a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

The study is part of the The Regeneration Roadmap, a collaborative and multi-faceted thought leadership initiative designed to engage the private sector in advancing sustainable development by improving sustainability strategy, increasing credibility and delivering results at greater speed and scale.

Presenting Sponsors of The Regeneration Roadmap are BMW Group and SC Johnson. Sponsors include Cisco, DuPont, Interface and Pfizer. The Regeneration Consumer Study is sponsored by Campbell Soup Company, Itau, L’Oréal, Shell and Starbucks.

Published in Global Public Opinion

Born from the guiding values of the GlobeScan Foundation to Let Everyone Speak, the Survey of the Poor aims to help the poorest of the poor have a voice and be heard. Our goal is to help an often disregarded population tell others in their countries and the international community what they need, what they want, the biggest obstacles standing in their way, and what interventions have made the largest positive impact on their lives. We have consulted experts (and continue to do so) from various institutions around the world to help us with our inquiry; and in order to make sure that we develop a sound survey instrument before rolling out the project on a global scale, we have initiated an exploratory pilot phase of the project in India beginning with focus groups.

The seven focus groups were designed to examine the opinions of different social groups on what defines the ultra-­‐poor, the mechanisms that drive extreme poverty, and what life is like for those who live in poverty.

Download this report written with our partners at Cvoter India to learn more.

Published in Poverty
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